How about them apples?

We are specially talking about the Rhode Island Greening. Have you heard about them? Have you used them in a favorite recipe? We are dying to know more about this type of apple and looking for your help. Since the 17th century, this apple variety has been the go to pie apple because it keeps its shape and the flavor is enhanced by cooking which brings out the full “richest and sweetest of flavor”. 
We have over 10 apple trees at the South County Museum, including many RI Greenings. Why? Because we are preserving the rich agriculture history we all know and love because of our South County roots. The apples are not “pretty” grocery store perfection because we do not spray them but picked from the branch there is nothing fresher. Visitors are welcome to pick today 10-4. The best part about our apple orchard? Our staff loves heading to the “cafeteria” we forget our lunch!!
Source: Orange Pippin  https://www.orangepippin.com/varieties/apples/rhode-island-greening

Creating the Future Today in History Education

A museum educator’s primary job is to build connections between life today and the past. It is the most rewarding aspect of my job. History comes to life for countless school students who visit the museum each year. My mission: help them connect their backyard, their neighbor’s last name, or the building they pass every day to America’s most historic moments. The current pandemic has emphasized how priceless in-person learning experiences really are.

Thanks to financial support from the Rhode Island Council for the Humanities, I have redirected my efforts while the campus is quiet. Christina Young returned to work remotely as a summer intern. Her insight as a recent graduate from the University of Rhode Island’s history program has been invaluable. Together, we have developed a plan for new online exhibits, collections, videos, and lesson plans to support the museum’s guiding principles to:

  • ignite curiosity by exploring the lives of people and the tools they used on the farm, at sea, in the mills and the villages of South County
  • offer accessible educational experiences and engaging exhibits and programs
  • encourage historical thinking that helps build connections between the past and life today

The first collection on the blacksmith trade will be available on our website starting the third week of September. We hope you will come to check it out because curious learners of all ages are sure to take away something new. Explore the life of Solomon Fayerweather, a third-generation blacksmith from the village of Kingston. Experience modern-day blacksmith Jim Crothers practice the craft in a taped demonstration. Come back often for new subjects! In November, new material on “Communication in History” will be available to inspire middle and high school students to search for a topic to participate in the 2021 National History Day competition this spring.

A new Education Committee has formed to guide the museum’s efforts to support history education for students in kindergarten to college. Committee members include Daryl Anderson, SCM Board President; Diane Nobles, Secretary, SCM board and Narragansett School Board Committee member; Erica Luke, Director, South County History Center; Sharon Webster, RILINK Professional Development/Technology Support Specialist, and retired Narragansett High School teacher; Christina Young, and myself.

We may be a small, local history museum by our role and responsibility in the community is monumental. The South County Museum links a student’s backyard to the world because all history starts locally.

 

The Rhode Island Council for the Humanities seeds, supports, and strengthens public history, cultural heritage, civic education, and community engagement by and for all Rhode Islanders.